Multi enzyme complex may relieve symptoms of Functional Dyspepsia

Multi Enzyme Complex Supplementation Relieves Symptoms of Dyspepsia

Functional dyspepsia (FD) is characterised by a collection of symptoms that may include bloating, nausea, heartburn, burping and post-prandial fullness. 1 A multienzyme complex was evaluated to investigate its effects in adults with functional dyspepsia. 1

Methods: 40 adults diagnosed with FD were enlisted in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial. Subjects were administered either a multi-enzyme complex three times daily or a placebo over a 60 day period.

Results: Supplementation with a multienzyme complex was significantly associated with reductions in all indicators of efficacy compared to placebo. Findings suggest multi enzyme supplementation was shown to be both a safe and effective in managing symptoms associated with functional dyspepsia. 1

Reference

  1. Majeed N, Majeed S, Nagabhushanum K et al. Evaluation of the Safety and Efficacy of a Multienzyme Complex in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia:A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled StudyJ Med Food 21 (11) 2018, 1120–1128

New study using GABA and whey protein to build body mass in males

Using GABA and whey protein to build body mass in males

Supplementing with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and whey protein after resistance training helps males build fat-free body mass, according to the results of a new study.

Using 125mg of Pharma GABA (equivalent to 100mg of GABA), and 10g whey protein for 12 weeks, GABA was found to increase both growth hormone (GH) and protein synthesis, thus contributing to exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy [1].

GABA’s uses within the human body are varied, including it’s role as an inhibitory neurotransmitter, anxiolytic and relaxant via increasing parasympathetic nervous system activities [2-5] . However from a physiologic perspective, GABA controls the pituitary gland’s secretion of GH, thus having a key role in muscle growth [6, 7]. Furthermore, GH facilitates increased amino acid transport and cellular amino acid uptake [8].

In the single-blind, randomised and placebo-controlled study, 26 males were randomised into two groups, either whey protein (WP) only or WP + GABA. Resistance exercise was undertaken twice per week, with supplementation administered 15 minutes prior to training or prior to sleep on the exercise-free days [1].

Results at weeks 4 and 8 showed substantially higher resting plasma GH concentrations in the WP + GABA group compared to baseline. This was responsible in part for the significantly enhanced whole body fat-free mass in participants in the WP + GABA group versus WP alone [1].

References

[1] Sakashita, M., Nakamura, U., Horie, N., Yokoyama, Y., Kim, M., & Fujita, S. (2019). Oral Supplementation Using Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Whey Protein Improves Whole Body Fat-Free Mass in Men After Resistance Training. Journal of Clinical Medicine Research, 11(6), 428–434. https://doi.org/10.14740/jocmr3817

[2] Abdou, A., Higashiguchi, S., Horie, K., Kim, M., Hatta, H., & Yokogoshi, H. (2006). Relaxation and immunity enhancement effects of γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration in humans. BioFactors, 26, 201–208.

[3] Yoto, A., Murao, S., Motoki, M., Yokoyama, Y., Horie, N., Takeshima, K., … Yokogoshi, H. (2012). Oral intake of γ-aminobutyric acid affects mood and activities of central nervous system during stressed condition induced by mental tasks. Amino Acids, 43(3), 1331–1337. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00726-011-1206-6

[4] Yamatsu, A., Yamashita, Y., Pandharipande, T., Maru, I., & Kim, M. (2016). Effect of oral γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration on sleep and its absorption in humans. Food Science and Biotechnology, 25(2), 547–551. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10068-016-0076-9

[5] Fujibayashi M., Kamiya T., Takagaki K., & Moritani T. (2008). Activation of Autonomic Nervous System Activity by the Oral Ingestion of GABA. Nippon Eiyo Shokuryo Gakkaishi, 61(3), 129–133. https://doi.org/10.4327/jsnfs.61.129

[6] Acs, Z., Szabó, B., Kapócs, G., & Makara, G. B. (1987). gamma-Aminobutyric acid stimulates pituitary growth hormone secretion in the neonatal rat. A superfusion study. Endocrinology, 120(5), 1790–1798. https://doi.org/10.1210/endo-120-5-1790

[7] Godfrey, R. J., Madgwick, Z., & Whyte, G. P. (2003). The exercise-induced growth hormone response in athletes. Sports Medicine (Auckland, N.Z.), 33(8), 599–613. https://doi.org/10.2165/00007256-200333080-00005

[8] Riggs, T. R., & Walker, L. M. (1960). Growth hormone stimulation of amino acid transport into rat tissues in vivo. The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 235, 3603–3607.

Treating cyclic mastalgia with Vitex agnus castus

Treating cyclical mastalgia with Vitex agnus castus

Cyclical mastalgia (breast pain that varies during the menstrual cycle) is a relatively common condition in premenstrual women. [1] Latent hyperprolactinaemia is suggested to be a contributing factor in the conditions aetiology. Vitex agnus castus (VAC) has been researched as a potential treatment due to its dopaminergic activity. A new systematic review and meta-analysis sought to examine the treatment efficacy of VAC on cyclic mastalgia [2].

Upon examining 25 relevant studies of cyclic mastalgia sufferers aged 18 – 45, the systematic review concluded that VAC had efficacy in lowering breast pain intensity whilst also decreasing serum prolactin levels. The dosage range studied was 20 – 40mg per day, taken over a 3-month duration. [2]

The meta-analysis considered six studies, concluding there was a moderate effect size for VAC usage in cyclic mastalgia, versus placebo (SMD: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.5-0.85). Another seven trials believed pharmacological agents such as hormonal contraceptives showed more efficacy for treating cyclic mastalgia versus VAC. [2]

In summary the authors concluded that whilst more clinical trials are needed, VAC was a safe and efficacious treatment for cyclic mastalgia.

References

[1] Brennan, M., Housamii, N., & French, J. (2005). Management of Benign breast conditions. Australian Family Physician. Vol34;3, March 2015.

[2] Ooi, S., Watts, S., McClean, R., & Pak, S. (2019). Vitex Agnus-Castus for the Treatment of Cyclic Mastalgia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Women’s Health, https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2019.7770

Antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of Nopal Cactus cladodes

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The anti-melanogenic potential of L-glutathione

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The inverse relationship between maternal P5P and cystathionine plasma levels

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Neuroprotective actions of 3,3’-diindolylmethane (DIM) against ischemia

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Winter is coming…take preventative steps now to support immunity

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Vitamin B6 is effective in reducing symptoms associated with Premenstrual syndrome

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The benefits of Setria® glutathione supplementation

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